Speakers

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Mike Palte
Principal Scientist
Biogen

Mike joined Biogen in 2018 as a Principal Scientist, supporting research activities for several multiple sclerosis (MS) programs. In 2020, he became an Associate Medical Director for the MS development unit, running phase I and phase II clinical trials. Mike received his MD/PhD (Pharmacology) from the University of Wisconsin – Madison. He did his graduate work in the Raines Lab (now at MIT), developing new methodologies for drug delivery systems. Afterwards, Mike completed his residency in clinical pathology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and did a post-doctoral fellowship at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard in the Schreiber Lab, investigating biomarkers of ferroptosis.

Day Two

Thursday, October 15 2020

10:40 am | Live Q&A

10:10 am | From Early-Generation to Next-Generation Reversible BTK Inhibitors

Andre Limnander
Senior Staff Scientist, Immunology and Inflammation
Regeneron Pharmaceuticals

Day Two

Thursday, October 15 2020

3:30 pm | Chronic Allergen Exposure Drives Accumulation of Long-Lived IgE Plasma Cells in the Bone Marrow, Giving Rise to Serological Memory

4:00 pm | Live Q&A

Paolo Casali
UT Ashbel Smith Professor and Distinguished Research Professor of Molecular Immunology & Genetics and Professor of Medicine
University of Texas Long School of Medicine, UT Health San Antonio

Dr. Casali’s research focuses on mechanisms of immunoglobulin locus activation and targeting, as well as regulation of genome-wide and specific gene expression by epigenetic marks and gut microbiota, in antibody/autoantibody responses and immune memory.

Day One

Wednesday, October 14 2020

9:40 am | Epigenetic Regulation of Antibody and Autoantibody Responses

10:40 am | Live Q&A

James Rush
Global New Products Director, Early Pipeline (Immunology, Hepatology, Dermatology Franchise)
Novartis

Day Two

Thursday, October 15 2020

12:00 pm | Development of an anti-CD40 antibody for solid organ transplantation and autoimmune disease

1:00 pm | Live Q&A

Bertrand Huard
Professor, Immunology
University of Grenoble-Alpes

Bertrand Huard received his Ph.D. degree in Immunology from the university Paris VII Denis Diderot in 1995. At that time, he discovered the function of a molecule called lymphocyte activation gene 3, an actual immune checkpoint to watch in the immunotherapy of cancers. His first postdoctoral training at the Scripps research institute in San Diego led him to find a new pathway for peripheral tolerance based on a TCR-controlled dynamic expression of inhibitory receptors. Then, he started to conduct his own research as a principal investigator in 2005 during his residency in the Pathology-Immunology department of the Geneva Medicine faculty. He got appointed as a professor at the university Grenoble-Alpes in 2013 with a chair of excellence.  Bertrand Huard has been working for more than ten years on the molecule a proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL) whose antagonism is considered in the B-cell directed therapy era as a plasmocyte-depletion agent. His research is highly driven by the use of human tissues to decipher the pathophysiological function of APRIL. Bertrand Huard has been or is currently consulting for eight private companies. Bertrand Huard is inventor on two patents related to APRIL.

Day Two

Thursday, October 15 2020

1:00 pm | Live Q&A

David Alleva
Executive Director
Akston Biosciences

David Alleva, Ph.D., has over 20 years of experience as a scientific leader in drug discovery and development of immunotherapeutics and vaccines in several biopharmaceutical companies and has published over 30 research articles in peer-reviewed journals. He developed one of the first antigen-specific immunotherapeutic clinical candidates for type 1 diabetes (T1D), an altered peptide ligand of insulin B9-23, and is currently involved with the biotech company, Akston Biosciences, focused on B cell immunotherapeutics for T1D. He led the T1D Immunotherapeutics program at the JDRF that drove a therapeutic research and development pipeline aimed at delivering novel therapies for the prevention and treatment of T1D via partnering with biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies. 

Day One

Wednesday, October 14 2020

3:30 pm | Live Q&A

2:30 pm | Antigen-Specific Targeting of B cells in Type 1 Diabetes

Jessica Kenison-White
Senior Scientist
AnTolRx, Inc.

I got my degree at Boston University in 2013. I then trained under Dr. Francisco Quintana at Brigham and Women’s Hospital for 3 and a half years where my work focused on understanding mechanisms of tolerogenic dendritic cell induction, regulation of innate immune cell activation in the central nervous system, and development of nanoparticle therapeutics. In 2016, when Dr. Quintana co-founded AnTolRx, I became its first employee. Since then, I have led 3 pre-clinical research programs aimed at validating AnTolRx's antigen-specific platform to promote tolerance in autoimmune diseases including Type 1 Diabetes and Multiple Sclerosis. 

Day One

Wednesday, October 14 2020

3:30 pm | Live Q&A

2:00 pm | Antigen-Specific Tolerogenic Nanoparticles for the Treatment of Autoimmune Diseases

Michaël Mingueneau
Associate Director, Multiple Sclerosis Research Unit
Biogen

Michael Mingueneau is an immunologist/neuroimmunologist experienced with target identification, validation and advancing drug discovery programs in the fields of Immunology, Neuroimmunology and Autoimmunity. As R&D project and group lead at Biogen, he directs a group of scientists on cross-functional project teams to develop therapeutics for the treatment for both relapsing and progressive forms of Multiple Sclerosis. Before joining the MS research unit, Michael was part of the Biogen Immunology department and led target identification and validation efforts in peripheral autoimmune indications including Sjögren’s disease, SLE and scleroderma. Before Biogen, Michael Mingueneau completed his postdoctoral training in the laboratories of Drs. C. Benoist and D. Mathis (Harvard Medical School, Boston, US) following Ph.D. studies with Dr. B. Malissen (CIML, Marseille, France). He previously developed genetically engineered mouse models and used systems biology approaches to better understand cellular differentiation of immune cells in both physiological (Immgen project, www.immgen.org) and pathological conditions (type-1 diabetes, lymphoproliferative disorders). 

Day Two

Thursday, October 15 2020

10:40 am | Live Q&A

10:10 am | From Early-Generation to Next-Generation Reversible BTK Inhibitors

Shibeshih Belachew
Senior Medical Director, Head of Remyelination and Exploratory Development Science for MS
Biogen

Shibeshih Belachew (MD, PhD) completed his Medical School, Neurology postgraduate training and PhD in Biomedical Science at the University of Liège in Belgium. Shibeshih has been post-doctoral fellow in the Laboratory of Cellular and Synaptic Neurophysiology at the National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, MD) and at the Center for Neuroscience Research of Children’s National Medical Center in Washington DC. He is a member of the Belgian Neurological Society and was a Clinical Professor of Neurology at the University of Liège before he joined Biogen in 2012 as a Medical Director for natalizumab and later Head of Medical Director’s office for Region Europe Medical Affairs. Shibeshih moved to F.Hoffmann-La Roche (Basel, Switzerland) in 2016 as a Senior Medical Director for the Ocrelizumab program and later became Disease area Head for Digital Medicine in MS/Neuroscience. Since 1 December 2018, Shibeshih is back at Biogen as Senior Medical Director, Head of Early Clinical Development for Multiple Sclerosis. 

Gwendolyn Binder
EVP Science and Technology
Cabaletta Bio

Dr. Binder is Executive Vice President, Science and Technology at Cabaletta Bio. Prior to joining Cabaletta, Dr. Binder was the Chief Technology Officer of Adaptimmune Therapeutics Plc, where she initially established and led capabilities in vector and cell manufacturing, correlative science, compliance, regulatory and clinical operations to enable the transfer of clinical T cell receptor-engineered T cell therapy programs in oncology from the University of Pennsylvania. She later went on to establish the internal translational sciences, and manufacturing and quality teams and oversaw the planning and execution of an onsite manufacturing facility. She later assumed leadership of the research organization. Earlier in her career, Dr. Binder served as Director of Operations for the Translational Research Program at the University of Pennsylvania, where she participated in multiple novel engineered T cell therapy clinical programs in HIV and oncology including the data generation and IND drafting for CART19 under the leadership of Drs. Carl June and Michael Milone. Prior to that, she was the director of scientific affairs at VIRxSYS Corporation. Dr. Binder received her Ph.D. in Cellular and Molecular Medicine with a focus in viral immunology from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and her B.A. from Wells College. She has authored over 30 peer-reviewed publications and book chapters in the field.

Day Two

Thursday, October 15 2020

4:40 pm | Defining Research & Product Strategies to Accelerate Improved B Cell Directed Therapies to Market

Thomas Tedder
Alter Geller Distinguished Professor for Research in Immunology
Duke University School of Medicine

Thomas F. Tedder received his Ph.D. degree in Molecular Cell Biology from the University of Alabama at Birmingham in 1984, where he was an American Society for Microbiology President’s Fellow. He was a Damon Runyon-Walter Winchell Research Fellow at Harvard Medical School and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and joined the faculty in 1985, rising to Associate Professor and principal investigator in the Division of Tumor Immunology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. In 1993, Dr. Tedder became the inaugural Chairman and Professor of Duke University Medical Center’s Department of Immunology. He has also served as Director of the Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center Immunobiology Program, and numerous NIH, national, and international service and advisory committees. He was a Scholar of the Leukemia Society of America, and received the LeRoy Collins Distinguished Alumni Award, a NCI/NIH Shannon Award, the Stohlman Scholarship, the Leukemia Society's highest award for research in the field of hematology/oncology, and the Alter Geller Professorship for Research in Immunology at Duke. His laboratory research originates from a deep interest in the role of B lymphocytes in cancer biology and autoimmune diseases, with a recent focus on regulatory B cell subsets and how they regulate autoimmunity and other diseases. He has authored over 400 scientific papers and was recognized as an ISI “100 Most-Cited Authors” in the field of Immunology. Dr. Tedder holds twenty-five patents issued in the United States. He founded Cellective Therapeutics, with the largest Series A financing in the southeast at that time, that was acquired by MedImmune/AstraZeneca, who continue to develop the Cellective pipeline of therapies, including inebilizumab. He subsequently founded Cellective BioTherapy, an ongoing biotechnology company. Dr. Tedder has and continues to serve as a consultant and SAB member of over twenty national and international biopharmaceutical companies and private foundations. 

Day One

Wednesday, October 14 2020

10:40 am | Live Q&A

9:10 am | Keynote: Past, Present and Future of B Cell Directed Therapies

9:00 am | Chair’s Opening Remarks

Paul Smith
Senior Director - Pharmacology (Non- Oncology)
Incyte Corporation

Paul Smith currently works as the Senior Director of Preclinical Pharmacology within the Incyte Research Institute (Incyte Corporation) with a focus on autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.  Dr. Smith received his PhD in Immunology from Imperial College London (University of London) and subsequently completed post-doctoral training at the Biomedical Primate Research Center (the Netherlands). Since 2005 Dr Smith has held positions of increasing responsibility at UCB, Merck Serono and Novartis before joining Incyte Corporation in early 2017.  Dr Smith’s research focus has encompassed preclinical in vitro and in vivo approaches to identify potential novel therapeutic modalities for inflammatory diseases and facilitate rapid transition into proof-of-concept trials. Ultimately this scientific approach has contributed towards conference presentations, peer-reviewed publications, patents and regulatory approved therapies for inflammatory diseases. 

Day Two

Thursday, October 15 2020

10:40 am | Live Q&A

9:10 am | Pharmacological Targeting of PI3 Kinase Delta in B-Cell Driven Autoimmune Diseases

Changyun Hu
Senior Scientist
Jounce Therapeutics

Changyun Hu, received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from Fudan university, is currently a senior scientist working at the Jounce Therapeutics Inc to develop antibody-mediated immunotherapies for cancer patients since 2016.  After completion of his degree he has studied the role of innate immunity and adaptive immunity in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease at School of Medicine at Yale University. Using non-obese diabetic mouse as the primary preclinical model, he made significant contribution to understand the etiology of type 1 diabetes.  He was one of the first few researchers that demonstrated the involvement of gut flora in regulating autoimmunity through working on TLR signaling pathway. He was the first few scientists that proposed the T2/MZP B cells as regulatory B cells to control autoimmunity. His preclinical study on B cell depletion therapy was later tested in the clinical trial of rituximab for type 1 diabetes patients. He has published in high impact journals such as Nature, PNAS, Diabetes and Journal of Clinical Investigation. He worked at Antibody Engineering Department at Genentech Inc to focus on in vivo antibody discovery from 2015 to 2016. Dr. Hu is an editorial board member of Austin Journal of Obesity & Metabolic Syndrome, and reviewer for journals including Journal of Immunology and Diabetes. His interests are focused on autoimmune diseases, immune-oncology and other immunological diseases. 

Day Two

Thursday, October 15 2020

4:00 pm | Live Q&A

2:00 pm | B cell and Autoimmune Diabetes: Good, Bad or In-Between?

Amit Choudhury
Principal Scientist: M267 CD38 SIFbody Program Co-Lead
Momenta Pharmaceuticals

Cell & molecular biologist with 15+ years of post-PhD discovery & translational research experience in therapeutic areas of hematology (myeloma, lymphoma), oncology, autoimmune diseases in academia & pharma environments. Initiated mechanism of action-based biomarker development efforts to predict outcome and response to therapy & to better position differentiated products to overcome resistance to current standards of care in hematologic malignancies & autoimmunity. Led non-clinical pharmacology projects evaluating MOA of antibody- & Fc multimer-based therapeutics for autoimmune diseases. Performed & directed key non-clinical pharmacology & NHP toxicology projects that enabled discovery stage molecule transition from preclinical to Phase I & Phase II. 

Day Two

Thursday, October 15 2020

1:00 pm | Live Q&A

12:30 pm | Discovery of a Potential Best-in-Class Anti-CD38 Therapeutic Utilizing Fc Multimerization

Stephen Miller
Co-Founder of Cour Pharmaceuticals; Professor of Microbiology - Immunology
Northwestern University Medical School

Dr. Stephen Miller is the Judy E. Gugenheim Research Professor of Microbiology-Immunology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.  He received his Ph.D. in 1975 from the Pennsylvania State University and did postdoctoral training at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center before joining the faculty at Northwestern in 1981 where he currently serves as Director of the Northwestern University Interdepartmental Immunobiology Center.  Dr. Miller is internationally recognized for his research on pathogenesis and regulation of autoimmune diseases. He has published over 415 journal articles, reviews and book chapters and has trained multiple generations of scientists. His work has significantly enhanced understanding of immune inflammatory processes underlying chronic autoimmune disease employing animal models of multiple sclerosis (MS), Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and celiac disease (CD).  His work has focused on the study of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying treatment of established T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases using antigen-specific immune tolerance.  His current work is geared to translating the use of antigen-linked biodegradable PLG nanoparticles for the treatment of human immune-mediated diseases including autoimmunity, allergy, protein and gene replacement therapy, and tissue/organ transplantation. 

Day One

Wednesday, October 14 2020

3:30 pm | Live Q&A

3:00 pm | Inducing T Cell Tolerance for Long-Term Therapy of Antibody-Mediated Disease

Eric Meffre
Associate Professor
Yale University

Day Two

Thursday, October 15 2020

3:00 pm | PTPN22 Inhibition: A Novel Strategy to Prevent the Production of Autoreactive B Cells

4:00 pm | Live Q&A

Bruno Cenni
Director, Autoimmunity, Transplantation & Inflammation
Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research

Molecular and cellular immunologist in drug discovery in the field of autoimmune diseases, inflammation and dermatology. Experienced lead of drug discovery projects from target discovery, target validation, compound screening and optimization, ex vivo PD and biomarker assays, including enabling studies for clinical trials

Day Two

Thursday, October 15 2020

9:00 am | Chair’s Opening Remarks

Daniela Angst
Senior Principal Scientist
Novartis

After completing her chemistry studies at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich) Daniela Angst pursued a PhD at the Paul Scherrer Institute and the University of Basel in radiopharmaceutical chemistry. Following a postdoc at the University of California (UCLA) in total synthesis she joined Novartis as a medicinal chemist. She has worked on several projects in the area of autoimmune diseases, transplantation and inflammation. 

Day Two

Thursday, October 15 2020

10:40 am | Live Q&A

9:40 am | Discovery of LOU064 (Remibrutinib), a Highly Selective Covalent Inhibitor of Bruton’s Tyrosine Kinase

Michelle Ols
Director of Cell Therapy
Obsidian Therapeutics

Michelle Ols, Ph.D. is an immunologist who has been working in the fields of autoimmune disease and immuno oncology research at biotechnology and small start-up companies in Cambridge, Massachusetts since 2011. She is currently a Director at Obsidian Therapeutics, developing cell therapies with controllable protein expression. Dr Ols previously held positions at Padlock Therapeutics and Biogen, working to develop small molecule and biologic inhibitors of pathways involved in autoimmunity, such as peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs), lymphotoxin, and NF-Ƙsignalling. During her postdoctoral training at Yale University with Mark Shlmochik, MD-PhD, Dr Ols used transgenic mouse models to demonstrate roles for dendritic cells, IL-21, BAFF, and APRIL in the regulation and activation of autoreactive B cells. During her PhD training with Anthony Rosen, MD, Chair of Rheumatology at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, she investigated processes occurring during cell death that can break immune tolerance in systemic autoimmunity. She was also a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Heidelberg in Germany. 

Robert Axtell
Associate Member - Arthritis & Clinical Immunology Research Program
Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation

Dr. Axtell has dedicated his research career on understanding the heterogeneity of the biological pathways in the MS population with the goal to develop evidence-based approaches to provide personalized medicine for patients. 

Day One

Wednesday, October 14 2020

10:40 am | Live Q&A

10:10 am | Disease Modifying Therapies Reveal Dual Nature of B Cells in MS

Aaron Winkler
Research Fellow, Immune Tolerance Lead, Inflammation & Immunology
Pfizer, Inc.

Aaron is a seasoned immunologist with over 25 years of research experience in startup, academic, biotech and pharmaceutical settings. He has deep applied knowledge in the fields of immunology, hematology, respiratory disease, rheumatology and pharmacology, and al long-lasting interest in human macrophage biology in health and disease. Aaron has been involved in target identification, assay development, project leadership, and translational medicine at Pfizer, where he has demonstrated success in initiating and executing strategic initiatives to advance drug discovery projects from conception to the clinic. Currently, Aaron leads Pfizer’s de novo initiative in immune tolerance in the Inflammation and Immunology Research Unit. 

Claire Langrish
Vice President – Immunology & Biology
Principia Biopharma

Claire Langrish is the Vice President, Immunology and Biology, at Principia Biopharma. She is focused on the translation of drug and disease mechanisms, to discover and develop innovative therapies for immune-mediated diseases. During her post-doc at DNAX, Claire identified the key role of IL-23 in autoimmunity, and discovered Th17 cells, resulting in a dramatic shift in the field of immunology. Since then, she has held positions of increasing responsibility at DNAX, Roche, Takeda and Theravance. Claire received Ph.D. in Immunology from the Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, University College London, and a B.Sc. in Biochemistry from Imperial College London. 

Day Two

Thursday, October 15 2020

1:00 pm | Live Q&A

11:30 am | BTK Mechanism in B Cells and Beyond; Therapeutic Implications for the Treatment of Immune-Mediated Diseases

Aimee Payne
Professor & Co-Founder of Cabaletta Bio
University of Pennsylvania

Dr. Payne is a Professor of Dermatology and Director of the Clinical Autoimmunity Center of Excellence at the University of Pennsylvania.  Her clinical practice focuses on autoimmune skin diseases, with particular focus on the autoimmune blistering disease pemphigus vulgarisDr. Payne’s laboratory research has focused on understanding how B cell autoimmunity occurs in pemphigus in order to develop precision medicine therapies for disease.  Her laboratory pioneered a novel chimeric autoantibody receptor (CAAR) T cell technology for targeted depletion of autoreactive B cells, which is now advancing to clinical trials for mucosal pemphigus vulgaris.  Outside of Penn, Dr. Payne serves on the Medical Advisory Council of the International Pemphigus and Pemphigoid Foundation, the NIAMS Board of Scientific Counselors, and is co-founder and co-chair of the Scientific Advisory Board at Cabaletta Bio, Inc., focused on targeted cellular immunotherapy of B cell-mediated diseases. 

Day One

Wednesday, October 14 2020

4:50 pm | Live Q&A

3:50 pm | CAAR T Cells: Precision Cellular Therapeutics for Antigen-Specific B Cell Depletion

Christopher Richardson
Assistant Professor, Dermatology, Allergy/ Immunology & Rheumatology
University of Rochester Medical Center

Dr. Christopher Richardson is an Assistant Professor of Dermatology and Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology (AIR) at the University of Rochester Medical Center. He practices complex medical dermatology with an emphasis on autoimmune and rheumatologic skin diseases, in particular lupus, dermatomyositis, and scleroderma. Dr. Richardson is particularly interested in the role of B cells and antibodies in autoimmune skin disease.  His current research focuses on the pathogenesis of cutaneous lupus.  He completed his graduate studies under the tutelage of Dr. Ignacio Sanz, renowned expert in B cell biology and systemic lupus erythematosus. He has prior research experience in antibiotic resistance, T-regulatory cells, B cell tolerance, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), HIV, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), and alopecia areata. 

Day One

Wednesday, October 14 2020

12:30 pm | Live Q&A

12:00 pm | Targeting B Cells in Peripheral Tissues

Jörn Drappa
Head of R&D, Chief Medical Officer
Viela Bio

Rheumatologist with nearly 3 decades experience in basic and clinical research, including 17 years in the pharmaceutical/biotechnology industry. My goal is to introduce better treatments for patients with grievous diseases who currently have poor treatment options. My area of expertise is clinical development of novel molecules in respiratory, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. I have extensive experience in formulating clinical development plans for early-stage molecules, translational medicine, developing companion diagnostics, interacting with health authorities, designing and conducting clinical trials Phases I-III. Experience in leading cross-functional US-based and global teams. Successful track record in advancing molecules to Phase 3 in asthma, COPD, SLE, orphan diseases. Experience in developing drugs in a variety of therapy areas, including rheumatology, dermatology, gastroenterology, neurology, ophthalmology, and metabolic diseases. Currently leading the R&D organization of Viela Bio, a clinical-stage biotechnology company pioneering and advancing treatments for severe inflammation and autoimmune diseases by selectively targeting shared critical pathways that are the root cause of disease. 

Day Two

Thursday, October 15 2020

4:00 pm | Live Q&A

4:40 pm | Defining Research & Product Strategies to Accelerate Improved B Cell Directed Therapies to Market

2:30 pm | B Cell Depletion Therapy for NMO Spectrum Disorder and Other Autoimmune Inflammatory Conditions

Marko Radic
Associate Professor, Immunology and Biochemistry
University of Tennesse Health Science Center

Day One

Wednesday, October 14 2020

4:20 pm | Anti-CD19 CAR T cells: A Surprisingly Effective Strategy for Experimental Lupus

4:50 pm | Live Q&A

Gregory Wu
Associate Professor of Neurology Washington
University in St. Louis, School of Medicine

Dr. Wu was born and raised in Iowa. He graduated from Washington University in St. Louis with a B.A. in Biology before returning to Iowa to obtain his MD and PhD degrees. He received his MD and PhD degrees as a part of the NIH Medical Scientist Training Program at the University of Iowa. His PhD thesis work under the mentorship of Dr. Stanley Perlman investigated the mechanisms of virus-induced central nervous system demyelination. While a graduate student, he was a recipient of a National Research Service Award.   Dr. Wu began his post-graduate medical education as an intern in Internal Medicine at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Subsequently, he completed a Neurology residency in 2005 at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. During his residency he was awarded a Penn Pearls Award in recognition of his excellence in medical student education. He received several awards from the North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Association for research on visual outcome studies in multiple sclerosis led by Dr. Laura Balcer.  Following residency, Dr. Wu trained as a Multiple Sclerosis fellow at the University of Pennsylvania. He received a National Multiple Sclerosis Society postdoctoral fellowship from 2005-2008, which supported postdoctoral research training in autoimmunity under the guidance of Dr. Terri Laufer at the University of Pennsylvania. In 2008 he was the recipient of a K08 career development award from the NIH for his work investigating the role of dendritic cells in an animal model for MS. That same year he was appointed instructor in the department of Neurology at the University of Pennsylvania. He moved to Washington University in St. Louis in 2009 to start his own lab and has continued research on the regulation of immune responses within the CNS as an independent investigator. 

Day One

Wednesday, October 14 2020

12:30 pm | Live Q&A

11:30 am | Contributions of B Cell Antigen Presentation to the Pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis